In Photos: A Visual Tale of Luxor’s Agricultural Transformation

  • by

Visually, Luxor is most famous for its iconic temples: Abu Simbel, Karnak and many more. Yet beyond this, while there is the visual tale of ancient Egypt, there is also the current visual tale of Egyptian farmers that are opening up to the world and the future.

Today, investing in resilient agriculture is more important than ever. According to an article on the World Economic Forum, the COVID-19 pandemic “should spur us to redefine how we feed humanity.” Being the most labor-intensive, providing an estimated 28% of all jobs and 55% of rural employment, it is the most critical sector to alleviate poverty, provide job opportunities and transform communities for generations to come.

Climate change is also increasingly becoming a threat for many farmers. The World Food Programme, which funds projects in partnership with Ministry of International Cooperation, USAID and Ministry of Agriculture and Land, noted that climate change threatens to cut food production in southern Egypt by at least 30% by 2050.

Modern and smart farming techniques, as well as renewable energy technologies such as solar panels, are becoming more relevant to help drive development. In this visual tale of projects implemented in El Boghdadi village, one of 53 communities targeted, over a million farmers will be benefiting from projects irrigation lining, solar power plants, sun drying tomatoes unit that will also help enhance the participation of women through 200 seasonal job opportunities, and learning and collection centres that help farmers apply modern agricultural practices to export abroad.

“These current projects are changing our mindsets and are opening us doors to the world. It implanted inside all of us a new kind of affection and love for the land of Luxor,” Khaled Mohamed, one of the beneficiaries in El Boghdadi village, told Egyptian Streets.

Below are photos that capture Luxor’s agricultural development.

“To have this solar panel is a dream come true. It saves for us electricity and water, and helps save a lot of time and effort for us,” Ahmed Hemly, one of the beneficiaries of the projects in El Boghdadi village. Credit: Ashraf Hamdy

Farmer in El Boghdadi village. Credit: Ashraf Hamdy

Solar panel, which can dry crops at a faster rate and add an advantage of protection from birds. Credit: Ashraf Hamed

Khaled Mohamed, one of the beneficiaries in El Boghdadi village, told Egyptian Streets. Credit: Ashraf Hamed

Credit: Ashraf Hamed

Sun drying tomatoes unit, which help increase production of tomatoes by 100% and provide 200 seasonal job opportunities for women. Credit: Ashraf Hamed

Credit: Ashraf Hamed

Credit: Ashraf Hamed

Women at the Esna Packhouse, helping farmers to apply modern agricultural practices and meet international standards for exporting. Credit: Ashraf Hamed

El Boghdadi Village. Credit: Ashraf Hamed

El Boghdadi Village. Credit: Ashraf Hamed

Sun dried tomatoes. Credit: Ashraf Hamed

El Boghdadi Village. Credit: Ashraf Hamed

El Boghdadi Village. Credit: Ashraf Hamed